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Help Me Get Ready to Write

ImageReading  and writing go together. Both are ways to represent spoken words and to communicate information and tell stories. Once your child can grasp a thick crayon or marker, encourage them to draw and wite. Those beginning scribbles may not be actual words, but they have meaning to your child.  As children write, they become aware that the printed letters and words stand for spoken words. They begin to understand the purpose of reading through the process of writing. Scribbling and drawing  also help children develop eye-hand coordination and the fine motor control they need to hold a pencil.There are all sorts of fun ways to encourage your child to get ready to write:

  • Practice picking up small objects such as Cheerios (Remember to be careful of choking hazards)
  • Play with playdough. Make small blocks or shapes.
  • Build with interlocking blocks, like Legos or Duplo.
  • Manipulate paper- tear it, wad it into balls, and fold it.
  • Trace letters in the sand or dirt.
  • Have your child help you write the weekly grocery list
  • Write down your child’s stories and have them draw pictures to go with the story.
  • Make your own mailbox and have your child write letters to friends and family.
  • Teach them how to write their name.

-Karen B., 95th St. Library

Is this the best Children’s Book of 2012?

According to a Betsy Bird, a blogger at School Library Journal, Sadie and Ratz, by Australian teen author Sonya Hartnett, is the best book published in the States this year.

2012′s Best Book?

Sadie and Ratz are the names of Hannah’s two hands, and they exist to torment her younger brother, “Baby Boy.”  In this slim chapter book  (60 pages, 3 illustrated chapters) for younger readers, the author is able to venture into the taboo subject of the selfish and destructive tendencies of children, especially toward their younger siblings. Hannah describes her hands: “Together they make a good team. This is what they do: crush thing up/twist and scrunch/scratch!scratch!scratch!”

 Baby Boy soon catches on, and names his own bad hands, “Colin and Scraps!”

 This book has an edginess to it that most books for this age group avoid. The black and white charcoal drawings by Ann James capture the darkness and confusion of the  childhood feelings of displacement, imagination, jealousy and rage. 

So, is it the best Childrens Book of 2012? Check it out, and share it with your children,  especially those in the 5-8 age range.

-Carla E. @ Naper Blvd. Library

Children Skyping With Authors….NPL’s New Frontier

Image                        In the popular TV program, “Star Trek,” we saw the wonders of teleportation devices. In the movie, “Star Wars”, we witnessed the funny antics of the robots C3PO and R2D2.  At the Naperville Public Library, we have harnessed technology to easily Skype (video chat) with authors using a laptop, a screen, and a Communicator.

            This very week, NPL patrons Skyped LIVE with an author. With a video-feed of author Sarah Prineas projected onto a screen, our group of eager 95th St. Bookologists asked interesting questions and interacted directly with the author.  Not only did the author share the ideas that led her to create some of her magical books, she answered each child’s question thoughtfully and in an animated way.  She even held original items up to the web camera such as full-size drawings of her books’ characters and a life-size dragon knitted by one of her friends that is based on a character from one of her books.

              You might be asking, “Did the children like this new format of programming at the library?”  Well….as soon as we thanked the author for her time and ended the chat, one Bookologist asked, “When are you doing something like this again?”  Needless to say, we are hoping to skype more with authors in the future.

              In fact, if you missed the Skype visit this week, go to Nichols Library this   Wednesday, April 25that 4:30 p.m. for their April Bookologist meeting. They will also Skype with author Sarah Prineas.  It’s for 3rd-5th graders, and there is no registration required. Don’t miss this chance to learn secrets about the Magic Thief series and discover things you didn’t know about being an author!

              Be on the lookout for more technologically-advanced programs….brought to you by the Naperville Public Library!

Dig into the Bookologist Reading Club

95th Street February title

Nichols February title

        If you love talking about books and are in 3rd-5th grade, come to the Bookologist Reading Club! No registration is required—just show up and be ready to have a fun time! Not only do the Bookologists discuss awesome books that YOU vote on to read, you also participate in fun activities that are unique to each club. “What activities?” you ask. Well…..come and find out! In the past, our two clubs have made origami figures, hunted for clues in a scavenger hunt, played games, and written codes in a fantastical language!
       For the current Winter/Spring session, the Bookologist Reading Club is offered at our Nichols and 95th St. locations so you can choose which location works best for you. At Nichols, the club will meet from 4:30-5:15 on the fourth Wednesday of each month on Feb. 25th, Mar. 28th, and Apr. 25th. At 95th St., the club will meet from 6:30-7:15 on the third Wednesday of every month on Feb. 15th, Mar. 21st, and Apr. 25th.
      Ready to start reading the book for our February meeting? At Nichols, the book discussed will be Igraine the Brave by Cornelia Funke. At 95th Street, the book discussed will be Running Out of Time by Margaret Haddix. These books were chosen at our November meetings.
           Enjoy these fantastic books, and we’ll see you at the meeting!

 

 

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!

Happy new year! Are you looking for something fun to do? How about bringing one of your stuffed animal friends to the 95th Street Library or the Nichols Library for a Stuffed Animal Sleepover! Lots of fun things are planned for your furry friends. Check the Naperville Public Library website for pictures from Naper Boulevard Library’s program in December.

If you want to come to the 95th Street Library, drop off your animal friend on Tuesday, January 3rd between 1:00 and 3:00 p.m. and pick them up at the Stuffed Animal Sleepover Storytime on Wednesday, January 4th at 10:30 a.m.

At the Nichols Library you can bring your stuffed animal friend on Friday, January 6th between 4:30 and 6:30 p.m. and return on Saturday morning, January 7 at 10:00 a.m. for a storytime to enjoy with your family and animal friend.

Here are some good books for sleepovers:

Good Night, Sleep Tight by Claire Freedman

How Many Kisses Do You Want Tonight? by Varsha Bajaj

Llama, Llama, Red Pajama by Anna Dewdney

The Napping House by Audrey Wood

The Bear Snores On by Karma Wilson

Don’t Let the Pigeon Stay Up Late! by Mo Willems

How Do Dinosaurs Say Good Night? by Jane Yolen

WHY READ?

Dogs like Books!
 
 
 
If dogs enjoy books so much, why don’t all kids?
What can the adults in childrens’ lives do to encourage reading, in this age of instant gratification and visual overload?
 
  1. Be a good role model. Turn off the TV. Pick up a book., a newspaper, or a magazine.
  2. Share what you read!  If you think something is funny, your child will think so too!
  3. Find out where your child’s passion lies. Find books on that subject.
  4. Encourage your son, daughter, grandchild, niece,  or nephew, to make friends with the Childrens Librarian. He or she would love to talk books with your child.
  5. Give books as gifts, and treasure them as such.
  6. Display books, magazines, newspapers, all over your house. These objects make a lovely and inviting mess.
  7. Explore ebooks together — you can pack a lot of books along on a Kindle or Nook when you travel. 
  8. Listen to a Book on CD together when you are in the car.
  9. READ OUT LOUD — a shared story is a great pleasure,  a break from the real world,  and a wonderful pathway to bedtime.

TIME TOGETHER is precious.

 

Pause to Read

As part of the new Family Winter Read Aloud program, Paws to Read, we are encouraging families to take time to read with each other. In this day and age of hectic lives and busy schedules, it is difficult to spend any time together as a family, let alone sit down and read together. But reading together can be lots of fun.

The bedtime story is a ritual all over the world. There is nothing like cuddling with a child at the end of a busy day and reading a favorite story. My children still talk about the books we laughed at-Mop Top, Max and Ruby, and Bunnicula; and the ones we cried over-Betsy and Tacy and The Incredible Journey. Reading with children is a wonderful bonding experience, but there are many other benefits.

Studies have shown that children who are read to early and often grow up to be strong readers themselves. Reading aloud also builds listening skills and helps increase a child’s attention span. Reading helps the child learn about the world around them. A book can teach you new jokes, carry you off to a different part of the world or impart valuable information.

Children who are read to have larger vocabularies.Even simple picture books contain unusual words that we don’t use in everyday conversation. Talk about the book you are reading with your child. This builds vocabulary, helps them learn to recognize words and letters and also increases their ability to understand what they are reading.

Looking for advice on how to read aloud to your child? One of my favorite authors, Mem Fox, offers these suggestions:

Mem Fox’s Ten Read Aloud Commandments

1. Spend at least ten wildly happy minutes every single day reading aloud.

2. Read at least three stories a day: it may be the same story three times. Children need to hear a thousand stories before they can begin to learn to read.

3. Read aloud with animation. Listen to your own voice and don’t be dull or flat or boring. Hang loose and be loud, have fun and laugh a lot.

4. Read with joy and enjoyment: real enjoyment for yourself and great joy for the listeners.

5.Read the stories that the kids love over and over and over again and always read in the same “tune” for each book: i.e. with the same intonations on each page, each time.

6. Let children hear lots of language by talking to them constantly about the pictures or anything else connected to the book; or sing any old song that you can remember, or say nursery rhymes in a bouncy way; or be noisy together by doing clapping games.

7. Look for rhyme, rhythm or repetition in books for young children, and make sure the books are really short.

8.Play games with the things that you and the child can see on the page, such as letting kids finish rhymes, and finding the letters that start the child’s name and yours, remembering that it’s never work, it’s always a fabulous game.

9. Never ever teach reading or get tense around books.

10. Please read aloud everyday, mums and dads, because you just love being with your child, not because it’s the right thing to do.

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